A Gathering of Rivers: Indians, Metis, and Mining in the by Lucy Eldersveld Murphy

By Lucy Eldersveld Murphy

In a meeting of Rivers, Lucy Eldersveld Murphy lines the histories of Indian, multiracial, and mining groups within the western nice Lakes sector in the course of the eighteenth and early 19th centuries. For a century the Winnebagos (Ho-Chunks), Mesquakies (Fox), and Sauks effectively faced waves of French and British immigration by way of diversifying their economies and commercializing lead mining.Focusing on own tales and targeted neighborhood histories, Murphy charts the replaced fiscal forces at paintings within the sector, connecting them to shifts in gender roles and intercultural relationships. She argues that French, British, and local peoples solid cooperative social and financial bonds expressed partially by means of mixed-race marriages and the emergence of multiethnic groups at eco-friendly Bay and Prairie du Chien. considerably, local peoples within the western nice Lakes zone have been in a position to adapt effectively to the hot frontier marketplace financial system until eventually their lead mining operations grew to become the envy of outsiders within the 1820s.

Show description

Read Online or Download A Gathering of Rivers: Indians, Metis, and Mining in the Western Great Lakes, 1737-1832 PDF

Best native american studies books

Blackfoot craftworker's book

The most objective of this booklet is to motivate craftworkers and others drawn to the Blackfoot kingdom to benefit the conventional kinds. Of curiosity to artists, historians, and scholars of straightforward existence, in addition to craftworkers of every kind.

Indian Mounds of Wisconsin

A entire review of the Indian mounds of Wisconsin, discussing who outfitted the mounds, and while and why they have been equipped. It makes use of proof drawn from archaeology, ethnography, ethnohistory, linguistics, and the traditions and ideology of present-day local american citizens within the Midwest.

Recognizing Heritage: The Politics of Multiculturalism in New Mexico

In 2006 Congress verified the Northern Rio Grande nationwide background zone to acknowledge the four-hundred-year “coexistence” of Spanish and Indian peoples in New Mexico and their position within the usa. nationwide background components allow neighborhood groups to companion with the government to advertise historical maintenance, cultural conservation, and monetary improvement.

Additional info for A Gathering of Rivers: Indians, Metis, and Mining in the Western Great Lakes, 1737-1832

Sample text

Earlier scholars generally ignored or downplayed women’s experiences and the relationships between men and women either because they assumed these things were unimportant or because the information was difficult to tease out of the sources, or both. Although the search was often frustrating, I have found bits and pieces of information about gender as I sorted through sources, information that adds a new dimension to a very dynamic story. Women’s experiences, gender relations, and gender roles are important for a number of reasons.

Considerations of gender play a more important role in this book than in most other frontier studies. Earlier scholars generally ignored or downplayed women’s experiences and the relationships between men and women either because they assumed these things were unimportant or because the information was difficult to tease out of the sources, or both. Although the search was often frustrating, I have found bits and pieces of information about gender as I sorted through sources, information that adds a new dimension to a very dynamic story.

People ought not to use force against their kin or neighbors, the Indians believed. Even chiefs advised rather than ruled. ‘‘Subordination is not a maxim among the savages,’’ Perrot wrote. ‘‘The father does not venture to exercise authority over his son, nor does the chief dare to give commands to his soldier—he will mildly entreat; and if any one is stubborn . . ’’ 28 One exception to this principle was the status of slaves in Indian society. Since slaves were war captives, this anomaly probably arose because warfare, being by its very nature coercive, nullified the doctrine of individual freedom for enemies, even captive enemies.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.74 of 5 – based on 19 votes